• 27th July
    2014
  • 27
  • 27th July
    2014
  • 27
  • 27th July
    2014
  • 27
  • 27th July
    2014
  • 27
whittneydoll:

tiny-librarian:

fangirlconfession:

confess here || twitter || instagram

A) That’s not Angelina as Cleopatra, it’s Olympias the mother of Alexander the Great.
B) I’m not holding my breath for the movie to get made, it’s been rumoured for almost a decade now.
and C) That would be because she’s of largely Macedonian descent with a small amount of Persian.
The Ptolemies were in fact Macedonian Greek, which makes Cleopatra approximately as Egyptian as Elizabeth Taylor. The word ‘honey skinned’ recurs in descriptions of her relatives and would presumably applied to hers as well, despite the inexactitudes surrounding her mother and paternal grandmother. There was certainly Persian blood in the family, but even an Egyptian mistress is a rarity among the Ptolemies. She was not dark skinned.
Cleopatra, A Life - Stacy Schiff
So having someone of African descent or who had very dark skin play her would be historically inaccurate. It would be like having someone who was Chinese playing Elizabeth I. 

God bless, tiny-librarian.

Next they’ll be trying to claim that Anne Boleyn was some how ‘poc’ because she was described as looking exotic, having olive skin, black hair and black eyes. Even though she was pure blooded English, with a sister who had blonde hair and blue eyes.

whittneydoll:

tiny-librarian:

fangirlconfession:

confess here || twitter || instagram

A) That’s not Angelina as Cleopatra, it’s Olympias the mother of Alexander the Great.

B) I’m not holding my breath for the movie to get made, it’s been rumoured for almost a decade now.

and C) That would be because she’s of largely Macedonian descent with a small amount of Persian.

The Ptolemies were in fact Macedonian Greek, which makes Cleopatra approximately as Egyptian as Elizabeth Taylor. The word ‘honey skinned’ recurs in descriptions of her relatives and would presumably applied to hers as well, despite the inexactitudes surrounding her mother and paternal grandmother. There was certainly Persian blood in the family, but even an Egyptian mistress is a rarity among the Ptolemies. She was not dark skinned.

Cleopatra, A Life - Stacy Schiff

So having someone of African descent or who had very dark skin play her would be historically inaccurate. It would be like having someone who was Chinese playing Elizabeth I. 

God bless, tiny-librarian.

Next they’ll be trying to claim that Anne Boleyn was some how ‘poc’ because she was described as looking exotic, having olive skin, black hair and black eyes. Even though she was pure blooded English, with a sister who had blonde hair and blue eyes.

(via cosmopolitanchick)

  • 26th July
    2014
  • 26
  • 26th July
    2014
  • 26
  • 26th July
    2014
  • 26
  • 26th July
    2014
  • 26
  • 26th July
    2014
  • 26
(cont.) In China, you can buy WHITENING CREAM. In fact, the same beauty standards exist in India. I can't speak for the other countries you mentioned, but you should not just say things w/o sources. Moreover, how do you know if you don't like some one? Because of their race? That's prejudice. Pre-Judging them. you don't know them--but dislike them because of their race. This has ramifications BEYOND eye color (as you argue). Moreover, this shows the lasting impact of white-supremacy.

Asked by: Anonymous

shslactualjustice:

pokemon-for-social-justice:

I agree with you on some of that anon, but white isn’t considered beautiful to most in those countries, however it is true some women and few men want to be white, as when I was in Pakistan I saw some women bleaching their skin. That does not mean that everyone feels that way, as i guarantee that a lot of people over there do not want to look like and american or European. 

Also if not finding a certain skin tone appealing (romantically and sexually) is racist then i am racist towards my own race. 

~Mod Espeon

image

          Listen here, anon! I can’t speak for the other countries you listed, but you can go right on ahead and take Japan right the f-f-fuCK out! Pale complexions were ALWAYS a thing of beauty in Japan long before ANY Europeans happened upon there. It denoted wealth and aristocracy because only darker people were the ones who were ALWAYS outside doing some sort of labor (farmers and other common folk). Further south you go, the darker the complexion you can find, but many people with more concern with fashion than sports (esp. young women) will want brighter complexion. This has to do with the fact that, as I said before, it show your class as well as make you look young, innocent, pure, and give you blemish-free skin.

          Just while on this topic, I also want to bring up the point of Japanese, Korean having big eyes. It is NOT to look more European at ALL. Maybe some (such as the ones who go to America and feel out of place, esp. in earlier decades), but the [substantial] majority just want to have their natural Asian beauty heightened, ok? They do not want to look European―they still want to be Japanese or Korean. Do you not know that there are many East Asian with natural folds in their eyes and not just monolid? Shocking, I know.

          I usually don’t get so rude, but this infuriates me to no point. The desire to have pale skin in Japan, Korea, and China did not spontaneously happen from the introduction of Europeans.

―Chihiro

  • 25th July
    2014
  • 25